FYI Meet The 20 Most Powerful Publicists In Hollywood

By: ALY WEISMAN This post can be found here
When most people think of publicists, they picture someone like Vincent Chase’s fast-talking, cell phone-addicted, workaholic publicist, Shauna Roberts (expertly played by Debi Mazar) on HBO’s “Entourage.” 

In reality, most of these traits are actually true of Hollywood publicists, who are on-call 24/7 for their A-list clients.

Whether they’re crafting an actor’s image, babysitting a hard-partying starlet, fielding phone calls from press, or helming a multi-million dollar movie campaign, publicists are an integral part of the showbiz machine.

And they’re getting paid big bucks to do so. “The most basic services start at $4,500 a month and escalate toward what she calls ‘the high six figures’ annually for corporate clients,” reports one top Hollywood publicist in a 2011 New York Times profile.

So we decided to rank them based on their power in the business.

Our picks are based on the wattage of their client roster, feats accomplished, the nominations we asked for in August, and by talking to industry insiders such as journalists and producers who work with publicists on a regular basis, to get a sense of who really holds the keys to Hollywood.

Between TV, film studio, and celebrity publicists, we couldn’t possibly fit everyone on our list, so the following represents at least one in each category.

Although they often prefer to remain under the radar and let their clients soak up the spotlight, publicists know how important image can be. When we asked each of the 20 publicists on our list for further information, almost every single one replied: “Who else is on the list?”

 

20.) John Wentworth, Executive Vice President at CBS Television Distribution

20.) John Wentworth, Executive Vice President at CBS Television Distribution

Courtesy John Wentworth

Clients: “Dr. Phil,” “The Doctors,” “Rachel Ray,” “Entertainment Tonight,” “The Insider,” “Inside Edition,” “Excused,” “Judge Judy,” “Judge Joe Brown,” “Wheel of Fortune,” “Jeopardy!” and “Swift Justice With Nancy Grace.

Memorable moment: Launching such long-running shows.

Why he makes the list: In addition to helping launch a long list of successful TV shows, Wentworth oversees the publicity of 12 syndicated shows. Before his current position at CBS, Wentworth was EVP of Marketing and Communications for 11 years at Paramount Network Television.

19.) Nicole Perna, BWR

19.) Nicole Perna, BWR

Twitter

Clients: Jessica Chastain, Chloe Moretz, Sharon Osbourne, Jenna Dewan, Lucy Hale, Johnny Galecki, Ryan Phillippe, Diane Kruger, Nikki Reed, Kellan Lutz.

Memorable moment: Perna reportedly lost her temper after an Australia morning show teased an interview with her client Nicole Richie by showing video of the star’s troubled past.

Why she makes the list: Perna, who has been at BWR since 2002, was promoted in June to help develop new strategies to support talent in a changing digital landscape. In an announcement, BWR partner Nanci Ryder said Perna has “shown tremendous skill in client development over the years … With [her] leadership and insight we see the opportunity for continued growth and diversification of this company.”

18.) Jill Fritzo, Publicist at PMK*BNC

18.) Jill Fritzo, Publicist at PMK*BNC

Courtesy Jill Fritzo

Clients: Kim Kardashian, Khloe Kardashian, Kourtney Kardashian, Brooke Shields, Shannen Doherty, Denise Richards, Kristin Chenoweth, Vanessa Hudgens, Michael Strahan.

Memorable moment: “I have had so many memorable career moments. I love my job and every day it is exciting to be a part of what the clients are doing and what they are passionate about. I feel very lucky to have this job and be able to be a part of some very cool things! Memorable career moments are getting to work with some people who I idolized growing up.”

Why she makes the list: She reps all three of the Kardashian sisters. Last year alone, the Kardashian empire pulled in roughly $65 million.

17.) Joy Fehily, Partner at Prime Public Relations and Communications

17.) Joy Fehily, Partner at Prime Public Relations and Communications

Courtesy Joy Fehily

Clients: Aaron Sorkin, Olivia Wilde, McG, Seth McFarlane and Graham King.

Memorable moment: “There are so, so, so many! However, all of the ‘firsts’ tend to be the most special.  At my very first film scoring session, the director brought me to the center of the room with the orchestra while they were playing.  Being a part of this music and film collaboration process for the first time was one of my all-time favorite career moments.”

Why she makes the list: Joy is the founding partner of PRIME Public Relations. PRIME is a Los Angeles-based firm providing communications, brand management, marketing, strategic planning and social media services to the entertainment industry.  Clients of the specialty firm include prominent actors, award-winning filmmakers, leading television creators and producers, production companies, nonprofit corporations and sports leagues.

After receiving a dual degree in Social Science and Communications from USC, Fehily began her public relations career at PMK Public Relations, segued to Castle Rock Entertainment and then returned to the newly-formed PMK/HBH.  At PMK/HBH, Fehily served as senior vice president of their bi-coastal film department.

16.) Howard Bragman, Founder, Fifteen Minutes PR

16.) Howard Bragman, Founder, Fifteen Minutes PR

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Clients: Stevie Wonder, Camille Grammer, Chaz Bono, Petra Ecclestone, Adrienne Maloof.

Memorable moment: “The times I remember most are when my lesbian and gay clients came out of the closet and I could actually see and feel the lightness in their hearts as their burdens were lifted.”

Why he makes the list: With over 30 years of PR experience, Bragman now serves as an ABC News Consultant for “Good Morning America,” is the resident Public Relations Expert for “Entertainment Tonight,” resident Spin Doctor for HLN’s “Showbiz Tonight” and was a frequent contributor to “The Joy Behar Show.”

He is the author of the book “Where’s My Fifteen Minutes?,” has over 118,000 followers on Twitter and a deal with E! for a scripted series about PR — inspired by his real-life experiences.

15.) Danica Smith, Publicist at PMK*BNC

15.) Danica Smith, Publicist at PMK*BNC

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Clients: Colin Farrell, Olivia Munn, Wanda Sykes, Mike Epps, Zach Braff, Matthew Fox, Michael Pena, Carmelo Anthony, Kim Cattrall.

Memorable moment: Smith has helped Olivia Munn go from “Attack of the Show” host on G4 to starring in Aaron Sorkin’s HBO series “The Newsroom.”

Why she makes the list: Longtime publicist and PMK executive, Smith is a masterful talent publicist representing actors, actresses, comedians, sports stars, and personalities.

14.) Nicole Perez-Krueger, Publicist, PMK*BNC

14.) Nicole Perez-Krueger, Publicist, PMK*BNC

Courtesy Nicole Perez-Krueger

Clients: Matthew McConaughey, Christina Aguilera, Lauren Conrad, Jewel, Whitney Port, Marisa Miller, Stacy Keibler and Jeff Lewis.

Memorable moment: Under Perez-Krueger’s guidance and tactical direction, Lauren Conrad remains the third highest-selling magazine cover despite the fact that she hasn’t been on a television series for years. Also, by orchestrating strategic press coverage and positioning, Perez-Krueger transformed the public (and professional) image of Matthew McConaughey from a romantic comedy heart throb to a serious actor and awards contender.

Why she makes the list: A veteran entertainment industry publicist, Perez-Krueger joined PMK*BNC in June of 2011 from Rogers & Cowan. Perez-Krueger has an innate sense of media and is an expert at managing the images of her high-profile clientele.   

13.) Amanda Lundberg, co-head of 42West’s Entertainment Marketing Division

13.) Amanda Lundberg, co-head of 42West’s Entertainment Marketing Division

42west.net/lundberg

Clients: Tom Cruise, Kelly Ripa, Bobby & Peter Farrelly, “Bridesmaids” director Paul Feig.

Memorable moment: As as Senior Vice President of Worldwide Publicity at MGM, Lundberg was one of the key executives responsible for rejuvenating the James Bond franchise by initiating and carrying out publicity campaigns for “Goldeneye,” “Tomorrow Never Dies,” and “The World Is Not Enough.”

Why she makes the list: As the co-head of 42West’s Entertainment Marketing Division, Lundberg oversees film release campaigns, awards campaigns, and publicity initiatives for filmmakers. Before joining the firm as a partner in 2005, Lundberg was head of Public Relations at Miramax, overseeing publicity for worldwide theatrical releases.

12.) Jill Hudson, VP of Publicity at FOX

12.) Jill Hudson, VP of Publicity at FOX

Courtesy Jill Hudson/Fox

Clients: Jill is the lead publicist on two of Fox’s biggest shows, “American Idol” and “The X Factor.” She also used to run publicity for the network’s longstanding hit, “The Simpsons.”

Memorable moment: “For the past 16 years at FOX I’ve worked with some of the most talented people in the industry and have had so many incredible experiences, but I’d have to say launching ‘Malcolm in the Middle’ was the turning point in my publicity career. The show went on to become a huge success and it was so gratifying to work on campaigns that garnered truly gifted actors like Bryan Cranston his first Emmy nomination. Since then I’ve gone on to work on everything from ‘The Simpsons’ to ‘Hell’s Kitchen’ to ‘American Idol’ and ‘The X Factor.’ Both the latter have allowed me to travel all over the country and meet everyday people whose lives have literally changed the moment they stepped on that stage. It’s inspirational to be even a small part of that phenomenon.”

Why she makes the list: According to Gaude Paez, Vice President of Corporate Communications at FOX, “Jill is one of the most well-liked and respected network publicists I know, and I don’t think any list of top Hollywood publicists would be complete without her. Her ability to manage huge brands like ‘American Idol’ and ‘The X Factor’ and work with high-profile talent like Simon Cowell, Paula Abdul, Jennifer Lopez, Steven Tyler, and Britney Spears makes her a huge asset for the FOX network.”

11.) Adam Keen, EVP, Worldwide Publicity & Corporate Communications at Relativity Media

11.) Adam Keen, EVP, Worldwide Publicity & Corporate Communications at Relativity Media

Courtesy Adam Keen

Clients: Keen recently led the worldwide theatrical publicity campaigns for Relativity’s box office hits “Act of Valor” and “Immortals,” as well as the successful launches of “Mirror Mirror,”” Limitless,” Steven Soderbergh’s “Haywire” and “Shark Night 3D.” Looking ahead, Keen will lead the theatrical publicity campaigns for Relativity’s upcoming releases including Nicholas Sparks”’ Safe Haven,” Scott Cooper’s “Out of the Furnace,” Liam Hemsworth starrer “Paranoia,” Luc Besson’s” Malavita,” “21 and Over” and many other titles.

Memorable moment: “Working on documentaries or films based on true stories is always a pleasure because of the amazing and inspired people you get to meet. You feel the impact on these projects as you are not only helping to educate the masses on some great factual story or issue, but have the responsibility to represent the personal subjects as well. These are the campaigns that always stay with me.”

Why he makes the list: He’s worked everywhere! Before joining Relativity, Keen was senior vice president of Worldwide Publicity & Corporate Communications at Overture Films, head of Entertainment and Brand Strategies Division at I/D Public Relations, and spent five years as the senior vice president of special projects at MGM & United Artists where he oversaw specialized publicity efforts for both the domestic and international divisions. Before his employment at MGM, Keen handled similar duties at DreamWorks SKG in the special projects department working on such award-winning films as “American Beauty” and “Almost Famous.

10.) Cindi Berger, Chairman and CEO of PMK*BNC

10.) Cindi Berger, Chairman and CEO of PMK*BNC

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Clients: Robert Redford, Mariah Carey, Billy Crystal, Barbara Walters, Simon Cowell, Rosie O’Donnell, John Legend and Harry Connick Jr.

Memorable moment: “One of the most memorable moments in my career was the night the Dixie Chicks won the 5 top Grammy Awards including, Album of the Year, Best Country Album, Song of the Year, Record of the Year, and Best Country Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal (2007).”

Why she makes the list: Berger got her start at publicity firm PMK as the receptionist and worked her way up the ranks to become chairman and CEO of PMK*BNC. She has led countless film campaigns, consults for The Weinstein Company and works on OWN’s documentary film series. She also helped launch and continues to work on the award-winning talk show “The View” and “The Barbara Walters Specials.” 

9.) Lewis Kay, COO/EVP, Entertainment at PMK*BNC

9.) Lewis Kay, COO/EVP, Entertainment at PMK*BNC

Courtesy Lewis Kay

Clients: Jimmy Kimmel, Amy Poehler, Will Arnett, Zooey Deschanel, Louis CK, Tracy Morgan, Chris D’Elia, Joel McHale, Sarah Silverman and Paul Scheer.

Memorable moment: “I am sorry but it is Emmy week so I am tapped out on creativity right now!”

Why he makes the list: He reps the kings and queens of comedy.

During his more than 15-year tenure with the company, Kay has played an integral role in building the agency’s Media Relations area into the robust practice it is today.  Overseeing a staff of more than 30 professionals, Kay supervises the agency’s Television, Special Events, Lifestyle, Talent and Corporate Entertainment divisions.

Kay also oversaw efforts to grow the agency’s overall social media presence by a whopping 4,300 percent in just two years and is an expert in how to effectively utilize social media tools to enhance any communications strategy.

8.) Nanci Ryder, Co-Founder of BWR

8.) Nanci Ryder, Co-Founder of BWR

Ryder, left, with longtime client René Zellwegger.

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Clients: Katie Holmes, Mila Kunis, Ewan McGregor, Viggo Mortensen, Blake Lively, Johnny Galecki, Renée Zellweger, Amber Valletta, Matt LeBlanc, Eric Dane, Rose McGowan, Terrence Howard.

Memorable moment: In July, Katie Holmes left her shared publicist with Tom Cruise and returned to her pre-marriage reps, BWR’s Nanci Ryder and Leslie Sloane—who originally signed the actress at age 16.

Why she makes the list: The “R” in BWR stands for Ryder.

7.) Leslie Sloane Zelnik, Publicist and co-president, BWR

7.) Leslie Sloane Zelnik, Publicist and co-president, BWR

Megan Fox, one of Leslie’s star clients.

AP

Clients: Katie Holmes, Blake Lively, Kate Beckinsale, Megan Fox, Zoe Saldana, Diane Kruger, Michael J. Fox, Sarah Michelle Gellar, Emmy Rossum, Lucy Hale, Gretchen Mol, Melissa McCarthy, Chris Rock, Jason Biggs, Penn Badgley, Edgar Ramirez, Nikolaj Coster-Waldau, Chris O’Donnell, Mariska Hargitay, keke Palmer, Katharine McPhee, Lauren Graham.

Memorable moment: “I could give a moment with every client, but one that stands out is when a teenage Megan Fox got my phone number from Kelly Ripa and called me to ask if I’d represent her. It was very sweet.”

Why she makes the list: Despite saying “God I hate stuff like that” when contacted about this list, Cindy Guagenti — the managing director at BWR Public Relations — then recommended Leslie Sloane as one of her top picks to get a spot on our list.

6.) Shawn Sachs and Ken Sunshine, Co-CEOs, Sunshine Sachs

6.) Shawn Sachs and Ken Sunshine, Co-CEOs, Sunshine Sachs

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Clients: Leonardo DiCaprio, Ben Affleck, Barbra Streisand, Bette Midler, Cyndi Lauper, Darren Criss, Demi Lovato, Guy Fieri, Harry Belafonte, Jessica Lu, Jon Bon Jovi, Karlie Kloss, Kathy Griffin, Katie Lee , Leonard Cohen, Lin-Manuel Miranda, Malin Akerman, Naomi Campbell, Nick Lachey, Novak Djokovic, Ryan Lochte, The Band Perry, The Jonas Brothers (Joe, Nick, Kevin), Trace Adkins, Trisha Yearwood, Tyler Perry, Andre Benjamin.

Memorable moment: Shawn: “I am really proud of the type of work we do and the clients we represent. Nearly half of the clients we represent have a cause element ranging from documentary films to digital, celebrity, corporate, crisis, legal and of course nonprofit organizations. In a very short amount of time, we have grown significantly without compromising our values or losing our culture. I love that we work with clients like the Hollywood Foreign Press Association, American Red Cross, Calvary Hospital, Canon, DoSomething.org, NY Jets, NYC Ballet, Comcast and digital leaders such as IAC, Bing, eBay, Facebook, and the Webby awards — yet we don’t have a website. Keeping our unique culture while we grow is both the single biggest challenge and at the same time the greatest joy.”

Why they makes the list: A quiet yet super powerful PR firm, their clients range from celebs and corporations to non-profits and politicos. They have recently opened an LA office, run by Keleigh Thomas, and nearly tripled their number of staff.

5.) Ina Treciokas, Publicist & Partner at Slate PR

5.) Ina Treciokas, Publicist & Partner at Slate PR

Treciokas’ longtime client, Sarah Jessica Parker.

Examiner/AP

Clients: Harrison Ford, Woody Harrelson, Sarah Jessica Parker, Leslie Mann, Anna Paquin, Owen Wilson, Liev Schreiber, Jon Favreau, David Schwimmer, George Lopez, Justin Theroux, Anjelica Huston, John Leguizamo, Eddie Izzard.

Memorable Moment: Starting her own company after 13 years in the ‘biz.

Why she makes the list: After working at ID PR, Ina co-founded Slate PR. At the time, ID founder Kelly Bush (see slide 17) called the departing senior EVP one of her best friends. According to Deadline, “It seems like she is leaving at a time when Kelly is expanding the company into other more lucrative revenue streams, like brand representation and management, while Ina enjoys actual client representation.”

4.) Kelly Bush, Founder & CEO, ID PR

4.) Kelly Bush, Founder & CEO, ID PR

Twitter/kellylbush

Clients: Ben Stiller, Tobey Maguire, Ellen Page, Drake, Christopher Nolan, Javier Bardem, Diane Lane, John Malkovich, Alicia Keys.

Memorable moment: Bush took on actor Paul Reubens as a client and led the effort to revive his career by pushing him to resurrect his Pee-wee Herman persona for a 2007 appearance on Spike TV. A positive reception led to a Broadway run for “The Pee-wee Herman Show” in 2010 and a career revival that now has him starting production “very soon” on a new “Pee-wee Herman” movie with Judd Apatow.

Why she makes the list: This NYT profile of Bush discusses how she persuaded Sony to cast Tobey Maguire as the lead in “Spider-Man” by lining up a sexy magazine shoot, can get nasty headlines removed from Google, and jokingly says her goal for ID PR is “world domination.”

According to her Twitter bio, she is also “Mother of two girls. Passionate about equality. Endlessly curious.”

3.) Robin Baum, Publicist & Partner at Slate PR

3.) Robin Baum, Publicist & Partner at Slate PR

Courtesy Robin Baum

Clients: Johnny Depp, Ryan Gosling, Dakota Fanning, Chris Hemsworth, Daniel Craig, Alexander Skarsgard, Kate Bosworth, Naomi Watts, Orlando Bloom, Antonio Banderas, Melanie Griffith, Benicio Del Toro, Jared Leto.

Memorable moment: “A memorable moment for me was being acknowledged by Russell Crowe during his Oscar acceptance speech for ‘Gladiator.'”

Why she makes the list: Her client list speaks for itself.

2.) Meredith O’Sullivan, Head of West Coast Talent Department at 42 West

2.) Meredith O'Sullivan, Head of West Coast Talent Department at 42 West

O’Sullivan’s client, Jessica Biel.

Steffen Kugler/Getty Images

Clients: Jessica Biel, Reese Witherspoon, Will Smith, Ryan Reynolds, Rachel McAdams, Halle Berry, Rosario Dawson, David Spade, Scott Caan.

Memorable moment: Reese Witherspoon recently left her longtime publicist to be repped by O’Sullivan.

Why she makes the list: In addition to repping A-list talent, O’Sullivan is the head of the West Coast talent team at 42West — overseeing all staff.

1.) Stephen Huvane & Simon Halls, Founders of Slate PR

1.) Stephen Huvane & Simon Halls, Founders of Slate PR

Stephen Huvane with client, Jennifer Aniston.

Getty

Clients: Jennifer Aniston, Neil Patrick Harris, Ryan Gosling, Harrison Ford, Kirsten Dunst, Anne Hathaway, Johnny Depp, Channing Tatum, Ryan Murphy, Ridley Scott, Jude Law, Matthew Broderick, Annette Bening, Frances McDormand, Sam Mendes, Nathan Lane, Ang Lee, Brett Ratner, Gore Verbinski and Tom Ford. 

Memorable moment: Perez Hilton printed a fairly lengthy email Stephen Huvane sent to him regarding how the gossip blogger snarkily reported his client Jennifer Aniston’s break up with Vince Vaughn.

Why they make the list: After a long career in public relations and with a few brothers in the ‘biz, including CAA powerhouse agent Kevin Huvane, Stephen Huvane is deeply entrenched in Hollywood.

Simon Halls, whose longtime partner is “White Collar” star Matt Bomer, has played a central role in promoting gay visibility within the entertainment industry.

Together, they rep Hollywood’s top actors and filmmakers.

BONUS: Debi Mazar as publicist Shauna Roberts on HBO’s “Entourage”

Before actors need a publicist, they first need a director.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/20-most-powerful-publicists-in-hollywood-2012-10?op=1#ixzz2YktLAsB2

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Corporate to Agency Life: Differences Between the Two

By: Yvette Pistorio- This post can be found here

 

Corporate to Agency Life: Differences Between the Two

I come to you to talk about the differences between corporate to agency life because I’ve done both.

I worked on the corporate side for the first five years of my career.

Only recently (about seven months ago) did I join an agency.

Moving from corporate to agency life really showed me how different they are – and it’s not just billable hours, managing multiple accounts, being responsive at all times of the day and night, and client reports.

The pace, culture, day-to-day duties and tasks, income, purpose – really, everything is different.

Corporate Life

On the corporate side, things happen a lot more slowly. I forget where I read it, but the best analogy was when someone said it’s like being stuck at a red light. You’re waiting for the light to turn green; wait for it…wait for it…alright, maybe there is a mechanical issue with the light.

It takes longer to champion your cause, negotiate for resources, and see your projects through to completion. On the flip side, you have the opportunity to truly come up with an idea, follow through on your recommendations, and finish the project.

The good thing about a corporate setting: You have a much deeper understanding of the business, its culture, and the job role. It provides longevity and stability, but it lacks variety. There tends to be more conflicting objectives, not just between departments, but sometimes in your own team. And you have to become an expert at political maneuverings, which I found just annoying.

Agency Life

If you like a fun, fast-paced environment, collaboration, and continuous learning, agency life might be the right fit. Tasks and decisions come quickly. Actually, everything moves at a much faster pace.

There is continuous learning which is fun, but not easy. You get to work with a variety of clients and sectors, and you get to see a breadth of strategies. It requires you to know a lot about, well, a lot. Your clients expect you to bring your A-game every day, so there is a lot of note-taking and studying. You have to stay ahead of current news, trends, and technology. After all, your clients shouldn’t tell you what to do; you’re the expert.

An agency also affords you the opportunity to try your hand at different specializations. What that does, especially early on in your career, is give you the ability to find what you do and don’t like. An agency can also be filled with more experienced and wiser professionals who can help teach and mentor you.

On the downside, you aren’t privy to internal client discussions and sometimes are told about new initiatives much too late. You also most likely work longer hours, including nights and weekends.

Corporate to Agency Life

I can’t say I prefer one more than the other, because they are so completely different. Both have their benefits and drawbacks. Neither side is cushier than the other, but I will say life at an agency has kept me on my toes and I’m never bored…ever.

Do you prefer agency or corporate work? Why?

About Yvette Pistorio

Yvette Pistorio is an account executive and community manager for Arment Dietrich. She is a lover of pop culture, cupcakes, and HGTV, and enjoys a good laugh. There are a gazillion ways you can find her online.

15 tips for a successful PR career

By Dave Fleet – Post can be found here

 

 

 

 

One of the things I enjoy most nowadays is having the opportunity to speak to the future leaders of the PR profession when they’re starting out. I often get asked: “What tips would you offer to get ahead in this field?”

 

Now that summer is upon us and students are turning their minds to life after school, I thought it might be timely to offer some advice here.

Here are 15 top tips for success in a public relations career. Funnily enough, I’d give the same advice to someone 10 years into their career, like me:

1. Be a sponge.

Curiosity may have killed the cat, but it made the PR pro. Whether you’re just starting out or if you’ve been in the business for years, it’s incumbent upon you to constantly learn in order to stay on top of our industry. Never stop being curious.

 

2. Stay on top of the news.

Make time to stay on top of current events. Read a newspaper (online or offline). Set up news alerts for your company and/or your clients. Listen to the radio or to podcasts about industry news. Watch the news in the morning. Whatever approach you choose, it will make you more interesting and it will make you better at your job. Consider it an investment.

3. Focus on details.

Nothing hurts the credibility of a pitch, a proposal, or a program like sloppy mistakes. Meanwhile, people who become known for outrageous attention to detail become go-to people in a team. Be that person. Read and re-read your work. Be your own devil’s advocate in order to think things through and make sure you’ve covered all the angles. Double-check your calculations. Question your assumptions.

4. Learn to juggle.

This one applies especially to agency folks, but it goes across the board. Learn how to prioritize, how to focus when you need to, and how to manage your time. Life in PR is a juggling act, and you need to know how to manage your workload and the expectations of your clients—however you define them.

5. Learn to write.

Take the time to learn how to write well. Practice. Learn from others. Take a course if you need to. (I recommend the eight-step editing course by the Editors’ Association of Canada, but there are many others.)

Crucial for many new graduates, you may need to unlearn what your professors taught you in university. Short paragraphs, short sentences, and clear language help you to convey your point much more easily than the opposite.

Oh, and if you could put “by zombies” at the end of a phrase, it’s passive. Keep your voice active.

6. Embrace numbers.

Measurement has been a weak point in the PR profession for a long time. Nowadays, companies demand more. This is especially the case for social media and paid media programs. The days of output-focused measurement are numbered, and outcome-focused measurement is on the rise. You don’t need to be an expert in dissecting website traffic (especially if you have a measurement team supporting you), but you should know the basics and know how to coach clients and people within your organization on how to approach measurement effectively.

7. Measure through the life cycle.

Measurement is so much more than reporting, and companies are demanding more from PR measurement nowadays. Know how to take full advantage of the potential that measurement holds throughout a program:

  • Inform your objectives (setting realistic goals, fueled by insights from past programs);
  • Fuel your planning (again, with insights from past work);
  • Identify and help to address issues mid-flight;
  • Measure results and generate new insights to fuel future work.

[Check out more on this in my recent presentation on Social Media at Scale that I gave at PodCamp Toronto.]

8. Provide solutions.

Tough challenges are a fact of life in the PR industry, where the role of communications is often to help to change behavior or perception. That’s difficult. Few things will endear you to your boss more than this: Become the person who comes forward with solutions alongside their problems. It doesn’t have to be the solution they choose (that helps, though), but the fact that you’re thinking it through and considering solutions demonstrates the kind of mindset that managers adore.

9. Learn to stay level-headed.

PR pros frequently have to deal with difficult situations, many of which can’t be predicted. These are moments where you can distinguish yourself and improve your reputation, or the reverse. Be one of those people who keep a cool head. Stay calm, and focus on solutions (per the earlier point). Remember: frantic doesn’t mean effective.

10. Know what you don’t know.

Self-awareness is a valuable trait, regardless of where you are in your career. Be humble enough to know when you’re out of your depth, and to learn from those who have experience in areas you don’t. Make sure that when you find yourself in that situation you don’t sit paralyzed until it’s too late for anyone to help you.

Bonus points for thinking things through ahead of time and coming prepared with a suggestion: “I’m not sure of the best approach here… here’s what I’m thinking… what do you think?”

11. Learn the difference between objectives, strategy, and tactics.

Nothing makes me cringe more than seeing people confuse objectives, strategy, and tactics with each other.

Simply put:

  • Objectives are what you need to accomplish. They should relate to business goals.
  • Strategies are how you plan to accomplish them. They should drive toward the objectives.
  • Tactics are the actions you take. They should funnel up to the strategy.

Learn it. Preach it.

[Read more on how to set better objectives or download my ebook on communications planning for more pointers.]

12. Become a trusted advisor.

Whether you’re dealing with executives in your company, or with clients at other firms, strive to become a trusted advisor to them. Go beyond what you “have” to do and become a partner. Flag opportunities and threats. Offer strategic opinions. Learn to empathize with them. Have difficult conversations when you need to. Push them to take the right approach (but know when to accept their decision).

Don’t just take orders.

13. Learn from your mistakes.

Accept that you’ll make mistakes. We all make them, and they’re a key piece of how we learn and improve. If you don’t make mistakes, then you’re not trying hard enough or not trying enough things. The key is to make them at the right time, in the right setting, and to learn from them. Conversely, people who constantly shirk responsibility for mistakes, or make excuses, will never learn.

Some of my most valuable lessons, and most beneficial experiences, have come from making mistakes. They weren’t pleasant at the time, but I learned from them and I’m better for it. What’s important is owning them and figuring out what to do differently next time.

14. Think outside your bubble.

It’s easy to get caught up in your day-to-day routine. Instead, look around and proactively identify ways to expand your expertise. That could be by finding new ways to get better at tasks, or by getting involved in a project that stretches you, or by learning more about a relevant field.

15. Understand converged media.

This point began life as “understand social media,” but nowadays it’s broader than that. Start with understanding social media-monitor and participate in relevant conversations; think about how your programs might play out in social channels, and so on. Social media is just the beginning now, though. The key nowadays is understanding how earned, owned, and paid media play together. You don’t need to be an expert in all of them, but you do need to understand how to leverage them.

There you have it-15 tips for success in PR. What would you add to the list?

A version of this article originally appeared on DaveFleet.com.

The Most Influential Personal Style Bloggers Right Now

This blog can be originally found here

By: Lauren Sherman

Some say the age of the personal style blogger is over.

Today, the girl needs more than an outfit, a boyfriend, and a camera. Bloggers need to think about production quality, editorial strategy, and affiliate programs to really gain a foothold on the web. They are more like editors, creating publications worthy of a million-person audience than a few thousand super-fans.

Yet it still comes down to that camera. Nine times out of 10, the bloggers who move merchandise, who get people talking, who attract repeat advertisers, love to strike a pose.

So we say the personal style blogger isn’t going anywhere—-in fact, she’s more powerful than ever.

Fashionista’s list of the most influential personal style bloggers was determined by a strict methodology: We factored in Instagram, Twitter and Tumblr followers, monthly pageviews, press mentions, affiliate marketing successes, and industry sentiment. (Affiliate marketing, in this case, means the act of using trackable links to get a commission on products sold because you wrote about a product/linked to them. There are a lot of affiliate marketing programs: The most popular include Reward Style, Skimlinks and ShopStyle.)

To ensure the numbers we crunched were accurate, we worked with individual bloggers, affiliate marketers and Fohr Card, the new database for brands to access legit stats and information on thousands of bloggers.

We also took into consideration audience feedback about 2010′s list. You’ll notice that this group is tighter—any site arguably more about lifestyle than fashion or beauty was eliminated.

Like any list you read on the internet, our ranking is up for debate. And we encourage it! Let us know what you think. And feel free to Tweet me if you have any more questions about the methodology.

Click here to see who made it http://fashionista.com/2013/01/influential-fashion-style-bloggers-2013/2/

9 Things Every Publicist Does (Differently) That You Should Do, Too!

By:  Post can be found here

People will ask me all the time, “Why do I need a publicist?” If you have to ask the question, chances are you probably need one. Why? Because there are too many stories, too many angles, and too many opportunities you might miss by not knowing the rules of the game, so to speak. Authors, speakers, small business owners (turned authors) often launch headlong into their marketing campaign with little or no regard for the steps and the process of getting media. Some authors stumble into success after success, and that’s great, but it’s often not the norm. Why? Because in our zeal to tell the world about our story, we often stumble over our own efforts. We send pitches that are too long, or send them to the wrong person. Or we get a media person on the phone and fumble our elevator pitch. All of these things can rob authors of the chance to get some coverage for their book .

Over the years, a lot has changed in publicity. Players have come and gone, pitching windows have narrowed, and with so many stories vying for airtime, your 15 minutes of fame often seems like 15 seconds. To be successful, not just once but continually, you need to understand how publicity people view each facet of their job (and the pitch) and how they garner the media they do. Generally it’s not one thing, it’s a collection of tasks publicity people do over and over that gets them traction on a story.

Let’s look at some of the things we do on an ongoing basis and how you might be able to apply them to your own marketing efforts:

    1. Think like a journalist: This is probably the most important and the most difficult. When I say “think like a journalist” what I mean is thinking objectively and not thinking about yourself, your book, or your pitch because those don’t matter. The only thing a journalist cares about is “Will this interest my readers.” If you can work using that objectivity, you’ll gain greater access to media, both online and off, than you could have ever imagined.
    1. Know the rules: When I say rules, I mean not just the rules of your industry but the rules of pitching. When to pitch, who to pitch, how to pitch. A good publicist knows this, updates her information constantly (because media changes, moves, etc.) and lives and dies by these rules. Why? Get a reporter angry and you’ll see what I mean. Turn in a story late and see how much media coverage you end up getting. A lot of authors think they are special and different, and the rules don’t apply to them. Yes, you are special and different and yes, the rules still apply to you.
    1. Read outside of your market: They say that, eventually, everything ties into everything. This may or may not be true for all industries, but when it comes to promotion you’d be surprised how much a ripple over there can affect what you’re doing here. Reading outside of your market, mostly related to changes affecting other markets, serves a couple of purposes. First, the importance of creativity when you’re pitching can’t be overstated and sometimes to be creative, you have to look through your world using a different lens. By digging into and outside of your market, you’ll be able to gain access to information that could affect your message long-term, or perhaps give your brain enough juice and insight to bring a new set of ideas that will create some great pitches.
    1. Google Alerts: You can’t possibly follow every thread of discussion around your topic, or know where and when it’s being covered, but you do need to stay up on all of it; that’s where Google Alerts comes in. Yes, there are more elaborate tracking services, but Google Alerts is a great way to know when and where your topic is being featured. Also important, you’ll see who’s getting quoted and which media is covering your industry.
    1. Understand the importance of local media: Many times clients want to overlook local media. It’s not as glamourous or as big as national media. Well, that may be true but there’s gold in your back yard. We love local campaigns and local media loves their regional “celebrities.” If you haven’t done a local outreach you should. Additionally, network with local media by going to media events like Press Clubs (which anyone can register for). You never know where this will lead you, and you never know where your local contact may wind up on the media food chain. Years ago I worked with a producer for a local (small) Los Angeles station. We stayed in touch over the years and now she’s one of the head producers at CNN.
    1. Local vs. National: And speaking of local publicity — local media loves a local angle on a national story. If you can hook your book into something that’s going on nationally, then I suggest you pitch it to your local market. Good publicity people are always on the look-out for regional tie-ins, they make for great media!
    1. Media leads: I subscribe to several media leads services and I scan them, not just for existing clients, but to note trends nationally. Doing a quick scan of leads is a fantastic way to see what’s piquing the media interest. As you start doing that, you will also find that you’re responding to more and more stories because you’re starting to see tie-ins that you may not have seen previously (which is helped along by #3).
    1. Realize the importance of a subject line: I know that the topic of subject lines in email pitching has been covered (a lot), but I can’t state enough how important it is or how much time a good publicist can spend agonizing over it. Don’t just willy-nilly point and click your way through your media pitching — subject lines are extremely significant, and most publicity people I know spend a lot of time crafting, redrafting, editing and tweaking them. You should, too.
    1. It’s all about relationships: Once you start getting media, remember that staying in touch with the person who interviewed you is important. Find them on LinkedIn, thank them for the story they did on you (I still send hand-written thank you notes) and then stay in touch a few times a year. Perhaps you can comment on a story they did or send them a quick update or a copy of your latest book. If you can become a reliable media source for someone, you’ll likely always be in their rolodex even when they move on. Just like the example I gave above, media can move, and if you’re lucky, your information will keep moving with them.

Being a publicist is more than just knowing how to craft a snazzy email, it’s a process and an ongoing effort. If done right, you can really pull in a lot of great mentions, features and even reviews. Building media relationships takes a while, and there are no shortcuts, but if done effectively, these relationships can grow and flourish throughout your career. And remember: Media loves media. The more you get, the more you’ll get. Know the rules, honor the rules and perhaps if you’re lucky, the media will beat a path to your door.

5 signs to discover if you would be a great Fashion PR Girl

by Yazmina Cabrera  This is our favorite  blogger when it comes to fashion PR. Click here to see post

Potential Fashion PR Girl

 

Yes, we all want to be there. For sure!
We fashion-PR-Girl-wannabes want to become part of that glossy world where everybody seems to smile the whole time, receive exclusive gifts and go to super cool parties. We all long to try that skirt, touch that bag and wear that jacket before anybody else. And moreover, we desperately want to be able to publicly announce that we are our favourite brand’s new PR person! Swoon!
I guess we all want to be happy at work, and there’s nothing wrong about it.
But how do you discover if you would be a great PR Girl for your favourite fashion brand anyway?
There are five ways of finding this out. But these signs go beyond the professional Linkedin-type skills. These are inner signs which matter in the long term, the ones you can’t fake nor hide. The ones which eventually pop up in breaks-by-the-photocopier or in a lunch with the Fashion Editor of Swedish ELLE.
I will take you there by asking you five simple questions and replying them from my perspective as a Stella McCartney’s genuine lover (and PR wannabe) and experienced Luxury PR Girl.
Visit Girl with a Banjo each day this week for a new sign! By the end of the week you’ll know if you are the right person to work as a Fashion PR.

No, You Can’t Pick My Brain. It Costs Too Much

Adrienne GrahamAdrienne Graham  Original Post http://www.forbes.com/sites/work-in-progress/2011/03/28/no-you-cant-pick-my-brain-it-costs-too-much/

But your knowledge has value. You’ve invested time and money into learning your craft and it’s not fair for people to expect you to give it away for free. Even friends need to understand there are boundaries.

For example I will no longer advise my friends or family for free. (Wow, I just made some people mad….they’ll get over it!). I have businesses to run, employees to pay, a mortgage to pay, an office rent to pay, college tuition, etc, etc, etc.

I’ve told this to friends who have promptly replied, “Me too, you know I don’t have much money”. SO WHAT. That means you either have to delay your plans or come up with the money to fund your dreams. Period. Giving away information is the quickest way to end up evicted or foreclosed on. Put that in proper perspective for a moment.

If you’re having problem drawing the line in the sand, here are some rules of thumb you should follow:

  • Believe that what you know is valuable. If it wasn’t then why are they coming to you? You’re their chance to solve a problem or find a solution. That has value. Charge for it.
  • Create a fee schedule. Whenever someone wants to pick your brain, make sure you have your fee schedule in front of you. Give them a quote for how much it will cost them. They’ll either pay it or move on. If they move on, good riddance. They weren’t interested in paying you anyway. Let them figure it out on their own.
  • Decline lunch/coffee invitations unless they are strictly non-business.If the conversation swings around to business, quickly and politely tell them you’re off the clock. If they are interested in a consult they can book an appointment and let them know what the charge is for that.
  • Keep it light. Some of you will probably cave and throw a few nuggets out there. If you do (I hope you don’t), keep it general. Give the why and what but never the how. Anything beyond the why and what comes with a charge. And don’t even point them in the direction to obtain the how. That’s short changing yourself.
  • Prominently post that there are no freebies. OK not in those words. But if you have a blog or website, and even on your social media profiles, make sure you mention that consultations are available at a fee.
  • Exchange for equal value. This puts you in an advantageous bargaining position. If someone requests free information or help, you must feel comfortable in asking for an in kind value service. Assess what they have that can be of equal benefit for you. If they are genuine, they should have no problem in an even exchange of knowledge. Only you will know if what they have is equal to what you’re giving.
  • Refer them to your “free” resources. If you write a blog, have published articles, have archived videos or podcasts or have a show in which you dispense advice, refer them to that information. Explain that those are the only free information sources you offer. Anything specific or beyond what’s readily available has a cost.
  • Don’t be afraid to send them to Google. You can recommend they go to Google, or any other search engine or to sites that have articles or information about what they need advice on. You can also recommend a book or magazine that might be helpful. Let them expend that energy they would have used in meeting you at Starbucks and hit the search engines to find their answers. Problem is, they’ll be overwhelmed with varying degrees of information. Not fun for them, but when they’re ready to put it in proper perspective and implement, they can come to you…for a consult…a paid consult.
  • Ask them for a paying referral. If they truly want your expertise, they have to be willing to help you out too. It’s kind of like the Equal Exchange point I made above crossed with paying it forward. Before you dispense any advice, ask them to provide you with referrals to others who most certainly need (and can afford) your service.
  • Don’t back down. I know it’s hard to say “no” sometimes. But you can’t back down. People will know how far they can bend or push you. Stand firm, set your boundaries and guard your treasures (your brain and the know how in it). The minute you compromise you devalue yourself and your expertise.

Most people are afraid to draw the hard lines in the sand for fear of angering a friend or losing a potential client or opportunity. Trust me, if they will walk away because they cannot get a freebie, they weren’t meant to be a client and there was no real opportunity in it for you.

Many in the marketing circles will tell you the freebie give away is vital. But it doesn’t always lead to a sale. Likewise giving away what you would do in a given situation during an interview will not necessarily lead to you being hired. It’s up to you to determine what you’re willing to give away and how much of it. Know your worth, understand your value. Stop being taken advantage of. No more freebies.

Til next time.

Adrienne Graham
No, you can’t pick my brain!

Stay tuned for the release of my new book “Get Recruited: Secrets from a Top Recruiter to Use Unconventional Tactics to Get Noticed in an Inconvenient Economy”

 

Women In PR Celebrated Their One-Year Anniversary In NYC

Women In PR, a professional organization dedicated to connecting like-minded women with nationwide professional development seminars and online public relations resources, celebrated their one-year anniversary in New York City with a two-day conference.

Public relations professionals and students from around the country joined Women In PR founder, Anje Collins, and her team for a two-day boot camp. During the boot camp, participants discussed “Fashion & Beauty PR: Where to I start?”, “Being a woman in PR: How to act like one”, “How to create opportunity in 2012” and “How to make social media work for you and your client.”

Attendees were given the chance to network with top industry professionals and ask questions about their experience.

The event was preceded by a cocktail reception at Flatiron Hotel on Thursday hosted by Tené Nícole, Marketing and Public Relations Firm to celebrate the anniversary and introduce the boot camp professionals.

Here is what attendees had to say:

Hi Anje,

First, I would like to say how much I enjoyed the Women in PR boot camp this weekend. I definitely learned a lot and you are an amazing woman! I was wondering if you knew of any job positions within fashion PR or event production. I will be graduating this weekend and the job hunt has been stressing me out! I really appreciate all of your help!

Thank you,

Julianne

 

I attended the New York boot camp and it was well worth the travel.  I am so thankful to have met Anje Collins and fellow women in PR like myself that attended the summit. Anje and the guest speakers answered all my questions and concerns. I came in not knowing what to expect and walked out with a clear vision. I learned more in two days about PR than I have learned in my entire post secondary education. I was supplies the tools for a beginner publicist to get started in PR. From a PR tool kit, to budget plans and pricing, to how to writing effective and creative proposals & press releases. The interactive almost lecture-like seminars were all very inspiring and educational. I will definitely be travelling from Toronto to Miami for the 2nd annual summit & retreat in the future! I am beyond thankful for the opportunity. My journey with Women in PR has just begun.
Adjoa Atuahene
Thank You having the Women in PR Boot Camp. It was a really good experience. As student at The City College of New York I learned a lot within those two days. Hearing you speak about y…our experience in the PR industry helped a lot. Listening to Jenelle Hamilton and Nikkia McClain share their stories was great. Hearing their stories was very motivational and helpful to a student like me. Not only were the speakers helpful meeting the ladies who attended the boot camp were great to meet. I learned a lot from everyone there.
Thank You,
Angelique Williams 
The bootcamp was truly an enjoyable learning experience. I am grateful for Women In PR and your openness to sharing real and insightful knowledge of the industry. Having also attended a previous summit, you continue to inspire me and keep me motivated toward my goals. I would highly recommend that anyone interested in PR attend one of your summits! Thank you again!
Sincerely,
 Michaela
Hi Anje! I’m so glad I could make it out to the NYC Boot Camp. I learned more than I ever anticipated and all those great guest speakers have me amped to work harder than ever! School can only teach you so much. I loved how everyone was so open to sharing their experiences and laying out how the PR world really is. It was a great positive learning experience. Hopefully I can make it out to the Miami one.
With Love, Mathusha
Hi Anje,
I
loved the class.  Even thought I have been doing  events/meetings/publicity for a while I always love an opportunity to learn something new…. and I learned a lot from you!    You are an awesome person and I love your energy.
It is possible to get a list of the attendees, with e-mail addresses?  I would love to stay in contact with the class and follow their careers.
Also, anytime you know of an opportunity in NYC, please let me know.  As a freelancer I am always looking for work.
All the best,
Lynn Aloia
 

Alison Brod Got Her First Client in an Elevator, Doesn’t Own a Single Pair of Jeans

Alison Brod

By 

When Alison Brod graduated from Tulane University in 1991, she thought she was a shoo-in for a job at an ad agency in New York that represented Ralph Lauren and Revlon. “The boss was my uncle’s close friend. I thought, of course they’re going to hire me to be this huge copywriter,” she says. And? “Not happening.” The job market then was tough. Brod gave herself 30 days to find an apartment and a job in New York, otherwise she’d move to Fort Lauderdale to live with her high school boyfriend and work at an ad agency there. She found both. Now 41 with two sons, Brod runs her own public-relations firm that employs about 50 people and represents almost 100 clients. She also has appeared on The City, clocks regular airtime on 24 Hour Restaurant Battle on the Food Network, and even turns down requests to be a regular on other reality shows. Though she’s famous for her love of all things pink, there’s much more to her and her brand than that. We sat down with Brod to talk about her plans to move into a less pink office, why she doesn’t want to be on reality television, the dress code for her all-female staff, and more.

How would you describe your mix of clients? I always say: from K-Mart to Mercedes, from the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame to Skyy vodka, from Lavo the nightclub to Urban Decay. Of course we love high-end glam, and everybody knows that’s the goal. But I really have my head held high walking around with a K-Mart account because it’s fun — that’s an ideal project for us, to think about how we want to market it. We also always represent some kind of lifestyle group, be it the newest restaurant or club.

How did you get into PR? I met a guy on my fourth day in New York — who I’ve been married to for eighteen years — and he invited me as his date to a benefit for the fashion industry. It was for Si Newhouse. We literally had the worst table in the entire place. I saw this woman from a fashion agency and walked up to her and gave that typical speech — “I’ll sweep the floors, I’ll do anything!” I got a call the next morning at 8:30, and she said, “You’re hired.” I always thought that I just impressed her at this event, but I found out — literally maybe five years ago — that this woman said to my aunt, “How did your niece get to this big black-tie thing for Si Newhouse?” And my aunt said, “Oh, her family’s really close with Si Newhouse” — which was a complete lie.

So how did you break out on your own? This woman ended up hating me, because I didn’t know anything, so I went to go work for Restaurant Associates because I love restaurants, and then I went to go work for a small PR agency. Then I met a man in an elevator who lived in my building, and I overheard him — he was launching a new fragrance. I had just launched one for my agency so I said, “Who are you? Do you know who I am?” And he said, “No, kid, I really don’t. But why don’t you give me your card?” A week later he called and said, “I’ve been thinking about my conversation in the elevator, and I’ve realized my publicist never calls me back. Would you want to meet?” So we met at Four Seasons, and two hours later, he said, “If you want to start your own business, I’ll be your first client.” And it was the relaunch of the Burberry brand, mostly on the fragrance side. He gave me an office and an assistant. That was fifteen years ago. I was 25.

How did pink become your thing? When I first started my business, my card and my logo were both navy. Because even though I do love pink, I don’t think it was as appropriate back then — there weren’t as many women with businesses, and I wasn’t ready to infuse personality because you had to be taken seriously. And I think when I got to a certain point where I felt confident, I switched it to a reddish-pink, and later on, I switched it to actually be more neon, because that was my true personality.

If you moved offices would you change aesthetics?  Ideally, my next office would be more glass and wood with just accents of fuchsia. But my apartment — I want to talk about my house, I’m just so sick of talking about my pink wardrobe and my pink shoes — I think when people come to either my Manhattan apartment or my Hamptons house, they expect pink everywhere. But both of them are extremely masculine. There are woods, rosewood, mahogany, and glass, and stone. It’s very Frank Lloyd Wright, something really different from what is here.

How would you describe your personal style? Years ago, I used to buy things for the design. And I don’t do that as much anymore because I think as I’ve gotten older, I’m very conscious of what my body type is and who I am. Looking good is more important to me now than standing out through particular items.

Do you dress up every day? I don’t own any pairs of jeans — I haven’t worn jeans in twelve years. I always wear dresses.

Where do you like to shop in the city? I really do try to wear the brands I represent. For example, all my costume jewelry will always be Dannijo. If I’m not wearing my own clients, I love Kirna Zabete. For basics, honestly, I love American Apparel. I shop at YSL. I’m short and petite — I wear heels every single day. But now, I think maybe having children changed me a little bit. Everybody says having children changes your life so much, and other things become less important. I’m here to say, No, all those little things that used to make me crazy still do. Except for my feet, I refuse to walk around uncomfortable. And YSL platform heels are the most comfortable shoes.

So were you actually working with Whitney Port? Yes. And we were working with her before The City.

You and Kelly Cutrone were sort of portrayed as rivals. To be honest, I know Kelly, and I like who she is, she’s really funny. We did it because it was a fun thing to do. And Whitney was our client, so they wanted us to do it. I went into it playing up certain things. It was easy to do.

You’ve turned down opportunities to be regular characters on other reality shows. Why? What I love doing is being in bits and parts of them. People are interested in an office with 50 girls. There are a lot of stories here. It is kind of a crazy place. The idea of having cameras here 24 hours a day — it’s just, there’s no reason for me to do it. I really like being a publicist. So I’m not looking to be a TV star. I’m not looking to write a book right now.

What tips do you have for people wanting to break into the industry? What impresses you? I would say the thing that annoys me the most about the women who are coming in here — nobody reads anything. I literally said the first person who reads anything other than Us Weekly is getting the job, no matter what.

People just say they read Us Weekly? Well, that’s part of the job.

Yeah, but only? I would at least say the Times and Us Weekly Another thing that’s been driving me crazy lately is that when people list their skills on their résumés, they don’t need to put Facebook. Somebody actually put Internet Explorer. And somebody put social media. We have a social-media division. When you work in PR, social media isn’t just a buzzword. You get paid to do this stuff. So I think a lot of people come in and they think if they throw Facebook at me, and Twitter, that I’m going to be so impressed, because I’m older. I say, “Have you developed strategies? And you’re analyzing how to use the Internet in the most successful way? Or does it just mean you have a Facebook account?” And they look at me and say, “No, it just means I have a Facebook account.” So I wish that people would do a little bit more research about what we do.

Do you have a dress code here? The dress code is, you can wear jeans, it’s just not my ideal. Using the word old-fashioned is going to make me seem old-fashioned, but that’s just the way it is. I’m formal. And I think that people hire us for a certain kind of image. And jeans to meetings is just not something I ever want someone to do. I just don’t think it’s appropriate. And somebody once said to me, “Well, our clients that we go see are wearing jeans.” And I said, “Well, they pay us not to.”

This post orginaly ran in http://nymag.com/daily/fashion/2011/07/alison_brod_got_her_first_clie.html 7/9/2011